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In 2021, Nevada enacted a comprehensive ghost gun law.

Under the law, a person cannot manufacture, assemble, possess, sell, offer to sell, transfer, purchase, transport, or receive a firearm that is not imprinted with a serial number issued by a firearms importer or manufacturer in accordance with federal law and regulations.1

The law also provided that it would be unlawful for any person other than a licensed firearms importer or manufacturer to possess, purchase, transport, receive, sell, offer to sell, or transfer an unfinished frame or receiver unless it is required by federal law to be imprinted with a serial number issued by a firearms importer or manufacturer and has been imprinted with the serial number.2 However, before the law could take effect, a trial court found this portion of the law unconstitutional.3  Appeals will determine the final enforceability of Nevada’s ghost gun law. 

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  1. 2021 AB 286, amending Title 15, Chapter 202.[]
  2. Id.[]
  3. Specifically, the court found that the law’s definition of “unfinished frame or receiver” was too vague to support criminal penalties. Polymer 80, Inc. v. Sisolak, et al., Case No. 21-CV-00690, Order on Motions for Summary Judgment (Nev. 3rd Dist. Dec. 10, 2021).[]